Pharmacy

Pharmacy

There are over 350 roles in Healthcare alone,
so when considering all roles in Social Care as well,
you will be sure to find the best role for you.

If you enjoy science then pharmacy could be for you. Medicines are the most common treatment offered to patients, and pharmacists and their support staff are vital in ensuring they are used safely and effectively.

Pharmacy staff play a vital part in patient care and recovery as well as public health, by using their expert knowledge of medicines and their uses. They work with colleagues in the wider healthcare team such as doctors, nurses and allied health professionals.

Settings you will find pharmacy roles include:

  • Acute Hospitals
  • Community Pharmacy
  • Primary Care roles including GP practices and Care Homes
  • Mental Health Hospitals
  • Specialist Hospitals
  • Research

In Community pharmacies, patients and members of the public can get their prescribed medication as well as lifestyle advice for better health. Good communication skills are essential for this role.

Types of roles available:

+Pharmacist

Pharmacists use their knowledge of medicines and health to prevent people from getting sick by helping them live healthier lifestyles and making sure they get the most from their medications. They work with other healthcare professionals, such as doctors, nurses, healthcare scientists and use scientific evidence to deliver care in the local community.  

Pharmacists can work in:  

  • community pharmacy 
  • hospitals 
  • mental health services 
  • primary care including in general practice 
  • education and training (academic pharmacy) 

Typical entry requirements: 

Pharmacists need to complete a five-year programme of academic and practice-based teaching. This includes four years of studying for a Master’s degree in pharmacy (MPharm) at university. This is followed by a one-year work placement called a foundation training year. Pharmacists need to be registered with the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) to practise.  

To study pharmacy, each university will have different entry requirements for their courses, so it is important to check with them directly. However, the general requirements for a university course are: 

  • three A-levels or equivalent in chemistry and a second science or maths, typically offers range from AAB to BBB  
  • pharmacy degrees with a foundation year may have lower grade requirements  
  • GCSEs are considered alongside A-levels, with most schools of pharmacy expecting a minimum of five GCSEs including maths, English language and one science  
  • some universities accept vocational qualifications such as BTEC Level 3, National Extended Diploma in Applied Sciences or the Access to HE Diploma 

+Pharmacy Assistant

Pharmacy assistants help pharmacists and pharmacy technicians order, prepare and dispense medicines.  They work as part of a pharmacy team under the direction of a registered pharmacist. They work with patients to answer their questions and help with their prescriptions. They also make sure the pharmacy has the necessary stock by ordering items, as well as receiving, loading and unloading deliveries.  

Typical entry requirements: 

There are no set entry requirements to become a pharmacy assistant. However, employers will expect a good level of literacy, numeracy and IT skills. They may ask for GCSEs or equivalent qualification and relevant work experience. Experience in a customer service role would be beneficial.  

+Pharmacy Technician

Pharmacy technicians are essential to the smooth running of pharmacies, making sure patients get the most out of their medicines.  Pharmacy technicians give medicine to patients, either on prescription or over the counter, and provide information on potential side-effects. They also help patients by advising them on their health and how to take their medications to reach the best possible care for them. 

They will sometimes need to refer patients on to another healthcare professional such as a pharmacist, doctor, nurse or allied health professional. They are also responsible for the supply of medicines at the pharmacy by working in the dispensary.  

Pharmacy technicians may supervise other pharmacy staff, such as pharmacy assistants.   

Typical entry requirements: 

Pharmacy technicians must complete a two-year accredited pharmacy technician course, involving a mix of practical work experience and study. They can be employed by a pharmacy as a pre-registration trainee pharmacy technician and study for a level 3 apprenticeship. Once completed this course pharmacy technicians can register with the General Pharmaceutical Council and then practise.  

Click here to find out more on accredited courses and entry requirements.  

To undertake the level 3 pharmacy technician (integrated) apprenticeship, you would typically need four GCSE or equivalent at A*-C/9-4 including mathematics, English language, science and one other subject. 

Where you could work in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough:

+Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Foundation Trust (CPFT)

Click the link below to find out more: 

Current vacancies 

+Cambridgeshire Community Services (CCS)

Click the link below to find out more: 

Current vacancies 

+Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH)

Click the links below to find out more: 

Where could I work – Pharmacy 

Current vacancies 

+General Practice / Primary Care

Click the links below to find out more: 

Pharmacy Professionals – C&P Training Hub 

NHS Jobs 

+North West Anglia Foundation Trust (NWAFT)

Click the link below to find out more:  

Current vacancies 

+Royal Papworth Hospital (RPH)

Click the link below to find out more: 

Current vacancies